Tag Archives: Target

#CMOSummit: A Smarter Strategic Marketing Mix

Here is the second of the three sessions I blogged at the CMO Club. This one was a roundtable discussion. This post can also be found on theCMOClub.com.

CMO Thought Leadership Roundtable: A Smarter Strategic Marketing Mix — Optimizing Across Digital and Traditional Media

  • Kenya Jackson, VP Marketing, Target
  • Terri Graham, CMO, Jack in the Box
  • David Hudson, CEO, NM Incite

Another title for this session might have been: “How do you best integrate social media into your marketing mix” given how much of the discussion focused on effectively leveraging social media. However we also heard from Target’s Kenya Jackson about their marketing mix, which goes beyond traditional and digital media to include signage and product packaging – and may even include sales associates.

Terri Graham kicked off the conversation with a case study from a cross-platform campaign for Jack in the Box. She credits the success of this campaign to the integration of social media from the outset, as well as the focus on “keeping it real.” They don’t tack social media on at the end; it is part of the plan, and part of the ideas, from the beginning.

David Hudson identified the concern that often holds companies back from leveraging social medial: How do we measure it? It’s clear that this is still an evolving field, although they have been able to demonstrate that exposure to sentiment drives purchases.

Target is looking at their mix (including broadcast, circulars, print, web, signage, packaging) from the customer’s point of view, in order to understand what really brings her into the store. And once she is there, what gets her to purchase? Should different departments within the store be presented differently? This would be a significant shift for the retailer. An interesting question was posed: could the store itself be considered social media?

Kenya Jackson considers their team members to be a “media type” – they are each representing the brand every day. Best Buy’s 3000 employees responding on Twitter are another example of the integration of online and offline branding through employee participation.

I found this discussion particularly compelling. For years, the internet was a place apart from real life. It was not particularly interactive, or, well, human. Now, it has developed into a social and engaging place, coming to resemble the real world more and more. And as the web becomes more social, we see that the line between online and offline is blurring. Does social media stop within the computer? I don’t believe the answer to that is clear yet, but the trend is there: we now do online what we do offline. We discuss the news, shop with our friends, share photos. Does the conversation end when we turn off the computer? Of course not.

Marketers have always been trying to sit at the family’s dinner table. Social media may just be the best way to join that conversation.

Guest blogger Sorel Husbands Denholtz often discusses social media at the dinner table and food with her online friends.